RESTAURANT REVIEW: TOIT, BANGALORE

 
For when you need the restaurant to get it right
I first visited Toit within a few months of its opening in 2010 but since I didn’t have a food blog then this review is being written on the basis of my second visit, 4 years later. In summary, I started off as a fan and years later, still am. In a world that won’t stop spinning the resilience of restaurants like Toit offer my whirling soul solace.Looks Like

Toit has the advantage most visually memorable spaces display – fascinating architectural elements as opposed to an effort to invoke interest in a staid rectangular commercial space with superficial décor additions. When the fundamental structure of a restaurant is so engaging, for example Monkey Bar in Delhi or the rickety open Piccadilly in Bombay, you don’t need pillar candles and bird cages to get people’s attention. Toit is housed in a unique wooden barn on verdant 100 Ft Road in Bangalore.

The place, though usually packed (both in 2010 and 2014), still offers a sense of space and serenity because of the high slatted ceilings and open, sun dappled layout.
Tastes LikeThe menu is fun with pub classics like Bangers and Mash. They’re also known for their pizzas which come with a long (and interesting) list of toppings and a crust so thin it could give Cara Delevingne a complex. The crust is a delicate, crunchy platform for the cheese, sauce and munificent toppings.

The real revelation for me were the Scotch Eggs. I understand from my very knowledgeable friend that the dish Toit serves isn’t authentic but they were three of the most perfectly soft boiled eggs resting on a bed of the world’s butteriest mashed potatoes, flanked with spicy, hot lamb mince. I can’t get them out of my head and I can’t wait to try to recreate the dish on my Restaurant Recipe Rip Off series.

Toit is also famously a microbrewery and implement a fantastically clever way to get people drunk. Order their sampler which sets out the beers in order from lightest to darkest and once you’ve tried them all, order the one you like best. The flavors range from incredibly mild (almost watery) to deep resounding coffee undertones.

Feels Like

Toit starts to get very loud and crowded by the evening, specially on weekends, and the staff seems overwhelmed by the crush of patrons. Getting a seat later in the day may require a long and tedious wait for a table. Go early unless you’re prepared for the bustle.

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